Transgender issues in high school sports brought up in House Committee
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Transgender issues in high school sports brought up in House Committee

Date: October 29, 2015
By: Melissa Zygowicz
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: 
The issue of transgender students playing on high school sports teams was brought up in front of the House Committee Thursday.
RunTime:  0:57
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap:  Missouri State High School Executive Sports Director Kerwin Urhahn told legislators transgender females are allowed to compete on a female sports team as long as they have taken hormone therapy for at least a year.

Urhahn says the one year of hormone therapy rule is based upon extensive research done by the NCAA.

Actuality:  URHAHN1.WAV
Run Time:  00:22
Description: "The studies that we looked at were what the NCAA had put out from all their doctors and their research that they have. It's about a 90 page booklet that talks about all the physiological changes that can occur and why they believe that one year is the blight line and stuff and that's what they based that upon. The policy is what they have said in their research and what they have put out in their booklet."
The NCAA states one full year of hormone therapy in male-to-female students is an appropriate amount of time to allow muscle mass to suppress. 

Female-to-male students do not have to take hormone treatments to participate on a male team.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Melissa Zygowicz.

 

Intro: 
Current standards for transwomen playing on high school teams was brought up during a House Committee on athletics Thursday.
RunTime:  1:00
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: Missouri State High School Executive Director Kerwin Urhahn told legislators current Missouri State High School sports standards allows a transwoman to play on a female sports team as long as they have taken hormone therapy for at least one full year.

Urhahn says the one year rule was put in place due to extensive research done by the NCAA but is unsure if the rule is fair.

Actuality:  URHAHN2.WAV
Run Time:  00:21
Description: "This is something that's not just here in Missouri it's nationwide and I will tell you there are states that have other lenient policies. It's basically just however they identify them self that day is what they can represent and we struggle with that because we believe part of the responsibility is to protect those young ladies."
The NCAA states one full year of hormone therapy in male-to-female students is an appropriate amount of time to allow muscle mass to suppress. 

Female-to-male students do not have to take hormone treatments to participate on a male team.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Melissa Zygowicz.


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