Ban on Sudafed would cut down on methamphetamine labs
From Missouri Digital News: https://mdn.org
MDN Menu

MDN Home

Journalist's Creed

Print

MDN Help

MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News
MDN Menu

MDN Home

Journalist's Creed

Print

MDN Help

MDN.ORG Mo. Digital News Missouri Digital News MDN.ORG: Mo. Digital News MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News
Lobbyist Money Help  

Ban on Sudafed would cut down on methamphetamine labs

Date: February 18, 2009
By: Nathan Higgins
State Capitol Bureau
Links: HB 496

Intro: Some legislators say a bill limiting Sudafed distribution will save lives.

Nathan Higgins has more from Jefferson City.

RunTime:0:40
OutCue: SOC

The House Crime Prevention committee heard a bill that would reduce the number of methamphetamine labs and meth related deaths in Missouri. 

The bill would require users of Sudafed to have a doctor's prescription.

Sponsor of the bill, Republican Representative Scott Lipke says Missouri has the highest meth production rate in the country and must act to stop it.

 

Actuality:  LIPKE2.WAV
Run Time: 00:08
Description: Don't fall victim to relying on the almighty dollar as a reason to oppose this bill. The time has come to end this problem once and for all.


Those who oppose the bill said paying for doctors visits to receive cold medicine would be too expensive for Missourians.

Reporting from the State Capitol, I'm Nathan Higgins.


Intro: Cops urged the House Crime Committee to make consumers receive a doctor's prescription for Sudafed.

Nathan Higgins has more from Jefferson City.

RunTime:0:06
OutCue: SOC

Legislators say a bill prohibiting the sale of Sudafed without a prescription would create frustration for consumers.

Opponents say the bill would increase co-pays and wait times at the doctor's office.

St. Louis Democratic Representative Jamilah Nasheed says problems may arise but children's health is at stake.

 

Actuality:  NASHEED.WAV
Run Time: 00:13
Description: "The black market is going to be at an all time high. So, I don't know if this is the solution, but I think we need a solution because I don't want to see a lot of children look like that."

One narcotics officer said Sudafed should be banned because it has the potential to kill people.

Reporting from the State Capitol, I'm Nathan Higgins.


Intro: Representatives in the House Crime Prevention committee debated today whether Sudafed should be banned from over-the-counter sales.

Nathan Higgins has more from Jefferson City. 

RunTime:0:44
OutCue: SOC

Narcotics officers supported the bill which would make it harder for methamphetamine users to get pseudoephedrine.

That drug is the main ingredient to make meth.

Democratic Representative Jeff Roorda said pharmacies should only make the drug available to customers with written prescriptions. 

Actuality:  ROORDA.WAV
Run Time: 00:13
Description: "If it doesn't have medical use then the answer is that it goes on Category I. If it has a potential for abuse, and this drug, as easily converted as it is, does have an unarguable potential for abuse, then it belongs on the controlled substance."

Opponents say the current electronic system that tracks the sales of Sudafed works well and removing the drug from store shelves will cause the state to lose sales tax revenue.

Reporting from the State Capitol, I'm Nathan Higgins.