Senate dispute could kill jobs bill
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Senate dispute could kill jobs bill

Date: April 1, 2009
By: Allison Blood
State Capitol Bureau
Links: HCS HB 191, SB 302

Intro: While Missourians are asking for more jobs, Senate dispute could kill a bill aimed at job creation. RunTime:1:35
OutCue: SOC

Republican Senator John Griesheimer said he doesn't think the bill will get back to the House, much less the Governor's desk.

Actuality:  GHEIM1.WAV
Run Time: 00:05
Description: "Well, what I perceive is going to happen right now is..I don't think...I think that right now we're at a stalemate."

Griesheimer said it would take a miracle for the bill to reach Governor Jay Nixon, because even if it passes Senate vote, the House will not approve the Senate's changes.

The bill's main goal is to create tax credits in order to promote job creation at a time when Missouri's unemployment rate is climbing.

Republican Representative Tim Flook sponsored the House version of the bill, and says he's open to Senate changes and wants to work with them to pass the bill.

Actuality:  TFLOOK1.WAV
Run Time: 00:17
Description: "I'm interested in the proposals, but some of the proposals, I'm not sure that they could work correctly. Like the appropriations process being involved with determination of whether or not caps should be higher or lower on an annual basis. No state in the Union does that, so it would put us at a competitive disadvantage."

Flook said Senators are worried corporations will become dependent on new incentive programs, but doesn't think those concerns should hold back the bill.

If passed, the bill would give a variety of tax credits to companies that create jobs, especially in research and technology.

Actuality:  TFLOOK2.WAV
Run Time: 00:09
Description: "Science and technology jobs is where the future needs to be for Missouri and America; to be competitive in the global economy we need to be moving to the cutting edge of innovation."

One of Nixon's priority issues at the beginning his term was job creation, but unless these disputes are resolved, Missourians won't see a new jobs bill this session.

From Jefferson City, I'm Allison Blood, newsradio 11-20 KMOX.
 


Intro: Senators fear a jobs bill could do more harm than good. RunTime:0:43
OutCue: SOC

Though Governor Jay Nixon says job creation is a top priority this year, a bill which would offer tax breaks to companies that create jobs could fail in the Senate.

Republican Representative Tim Flook sponsors the House version of the bill and said Senators fear the measure won't help most Missourians.

Actuality:  TFLOOK3.WAV
Run Time: 00:14
Description: "They oppose tax incentive programs that could become corporate welfare. I don't support corporate welfare, most of us do not, but some programs are under scrutiny right now because of the nature of the economy and the budget."

Flook said he is working with Senators so the legislation can return to the House with time to resolve problems before the session ends.


From Jefferson City, I'm Allison Blood, newsradio 11-20 KMOX.


Intro: Argument in the Senate is endangering the effectiveness a job creation bill. RunTime:0:38
OutCue: SOC

Republican Senator John Griesheimer said fighting among Senators has held the bill back from passing to the House and reaching the governor's desk.

The bill, aimed at giving tax credits to businesses that create jobs in Missouri, has been described as "corporate welfare"
by some Senators.

Actuality:  GHEIM1.WAV
Run Time: 00:05
Description: "Well what I perceive is going to happen right now...is I don't think...I think right now we are at a stalemate."

Griesheimer said even if the bill passes a Senate vote, the House will not approve the Senate's changes to the legislation.

It has been almost two months since the measure was passed from the House to the Senate.

From Jefferson City, this is Allison Blood, newsradio 11-20 KMOX.