Old bill could say "bye-bye".
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Old bill could say "bye-bye".

Date: April 21, 2009
By: Christine Slusser
State Capitol Bureau
Links: HB 747

Intro: A bill that one Representative says destroys marriages is on its way to being abolished...as soon as the Governor signs.

Christine Slusser has more from the state Capitol.

RunTime:0:43
OutCue: SOC

The law says anyone working in a correctional facility may not have sexual relations with anyone in prison or out on parole.

If the Governor signs, that law is about to change.

Representative Terry Witte (WITTY) from Northeastern Missouri sponsors the bill and he says a couple, both working for the state, came to him for help because the current law was ruining their marriage. 

 

Actuality:  WITTE.WAV
Run Time: 00:12
Description: "What you'd be doing is breaking up a marriage which obviously would already be under a lot of strain if you have one spouse who's a corrections officer and one spouse who's on probation."

Witte says when the woman was put on probation, her husband was told he could no longer live with her.

From Jefferson City, I'm Christine Slusser.


Intro: The Missouri Senate unanimously approved a bill that would correct what one legislator says was erroneously put into law in the first place.

Christine Slusser has more from Jefferson City.

RunTime:0:40
OutCue: SOC

Current law says those who work in a prison or correctional facility may not have sexual conduct with those on parole. 

A Northeastern Missouri Senator says he will be the first to admit the mistake in the law.

Democrat Wes Shoemyer explains that it is impossible to know whether someone out in public is on parole or not.

Actuality:  SHOEMY.WAV
Run Time: 00:13
Description: "Any employee of corrections who might come in contact with someone who is on parole or probation out in the general public who may have sexual conduct or relations with someone, would be guilty."

The bill was passed without opposition in the Senate and is now on its way to the Governor's desk.

From the State Capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.