Rising electric rates
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Rising electric rates

Date: February 24, 2009
By: Christine Slusser
State Capitol Bureau
Links: SB 228

Intro: Missourians are doomed to pay higher electric bills says one state lawmaker. 

Christine Slusser has more from the State Capitol.

RunTime:0:42
OutCue: SOC

There is still no vote in Missouri's Senate on whether to let AmerenUE pass costs for a new nuclear power plant onto its consumers.

The bill was introduced more than a month ago.

Jackson County Senator Republican Matt Bartle says the days of adding base load, the least amount of energy required to run day-to-day utilities, are in the rear view mirror.

Actuality:  BARTLE3.WAV
Run Time: 00:11
Description: "We need to tell the people the truth, that we haven't added base load in this country, adding cheap base load, the days of adding cheap base load are over and that your rates are gonna go up."


A Public Service Commissioner says the state is married to coal for the next fifty years whether Missourians like it or not.

From Jefferson City, I'm Christine Slusser.


Intro: It would be impossible to build a new nuclear power plant if a Missouri law remains unchanged according to utility regulators.

Christine Slusser has more from the State Capitol.

RunTime:0:41
OutCue: SOC

The largest electric provider in the state, AmerenUE, runs on 83-percent coal power but is looking for a change.

Public Service Commissioner Jeff Davis, says a 1976 law preventing companies from passing financing costs onto consumers must be repealed if AmerenUE is to build a second power plant.

Actuality:  DAVIS.WAV
Run Time: 00:12
Description: "Should we build a nuclear power plant? I have no idea, but if you don't change the law, I don't think we can even honestly consider it."

The Senate did not vote on the bill which would allow any utility providers to pass costs for financing new power plants onto customer's shoulders.

From the State Capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.