Low sperm counts linked to unhealthy lifestyles and pesticides.
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Low sperm counts linked to unhealthy lifestyles and pesticides.

Date: December 17, 2008
By: Christine Slusser
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: A study signals concern for Columbia and the people of Missouri because it found the people have lower sperm counts than polluted cities.

Christine Slusser has more from the state Capitol.

RunTime:0:36
OutCue: SOC

A study done by Missouri doctors found sperm counts in Columbia were much lower than in polluted urban cities.

East Prairie Democratic Representative Steve Hodges pre-filed a bill which would make it mandatory for insurance companies to pay for the diagnosis of infertility.

Actuality:  HOD2.WAV
Run Time: 00:08
Description: "Why shouldn't we be able to these families that would provide a good home for a child, why shouldn't medical coverage help assist them in having?"

Dr. Erma Drobnis with Columbia Regional Hospital and a researcher for the sperm study says pollutants in Missouri's water should be a cause for concern.

From the state Capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.


Intro: Low sperm counts in Missouri prompted a state legislature to pre-file a bill that would require insurance agencies to pay for the diagnosis of the infertile.

Christine Slusser has more from the state Capitol.

RunTime:0:43
OutCue: SOC

Dr. Erma Drobnis helped conduct a study that was expected to report that people who live in high polluted cities have lower sperm counts.

A similar European study found sperm counts were lower in cities with heavy pollution, but Drobnis says the study in the States had surprising results.

Actuality:  DROB1.WAV
Run Time: 00:12
Description: "That's what kind of got us thinking that it could be an agricultural problem. We actually expected to have the semen quality higher in Columbia, Missouri than in the urban sites."

Drobnis wants a bill that has been pre-filed by East Prairie Representative Steve Hodges to pass because it would require insurance companies to treat the infertile like those with other illnesses.

From the state Capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.


Intro: A bill pre-filed by a state representative has the support of a doctor who conducted a study revealing low sperm counts in Missouri.

Christine Slusser has more from the state Capitol.

RunTime:0:46
OutCue: SOC

East Prairie Democratic Representative Steve Hodges pre-filed a bill which would make it mandatory for insurance companies to pay for the diagnosis of infertility.

Dr. Erma Drobnis with Columbia Regional Hospital says she is happy about the bill because it will help educate people on the problem of infertility.

Actuality:  DROB2.WAV
Run Time: 00:09
Description: "That's one thing I would really like to see is that men can get something like a simple semen evaluation and that that would be covered just like any other diagnostic test."

Drobnis helped conduct a study that compared major cities such as Minneapolis to Columbia, Missouri.
 
The doctor says she was not expecting low sperm counts to be found in Missouri and thinks people should be concerned with pesticides in the water and their lifestyles.

From the state Capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.