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Lobbyist Money Help  

Worm farmers may recieve agricultural loan monies.

April 10, 2006
By: Tim Walker
State Capital Bureau

Earthworm farmers could soon be in line for state loans. Tim Walker has more from Jefferson City.

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Vermiculture, better known as earthworm farming, uses anything from banana peels to table scraps to create organic fertilizer.

And the proposed legislation would recognize these farms and allow them to receive loan money from Missouri's Department of Agriculture.

Jackson County Representative Gary Dusenberg says his bill will not only benefit farmers but all Missourians.

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"They can actually go to their landscaping store, or wherever they go to buy fertilizer and be able to buy these products once they are produced in the state of Missouri. And I think it's good for the environment."

Dusenberg says worm farming diverts 46 tons of organic material from garbage dumps every month.

From the state Capitol, I'm Tim Walker.

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Some of Missouri's squirmier farm animals could soon see state agricultural loan money.

Tim Walker has more from Jefferson City.

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Red, tiger and red wigglers; they're all among the kinds of worms used in Vermiculture...better known as worm farming.

Worm farming uses organic material like food scraps to create fertilizers.

And if proposed legislation passes the Missouri Agriculture Department could issue state loans for worm farmers in Missouri.

The bill's sponsor is Republican Gary Dusenberg, and he believes his legislation is good for all Missourians.

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"You can go with things from a restaurant that are leftover vegetables and things; fruit stands. They can go in and buy these and take them to their farms and feed them to the worms basically, and they recycle them. So it's good for the environment."

Dusenberg says there are currently three worm farms in Missouri.

From the state Capitol, I'm Tim Walker.