New coalition raises mental illness awareness
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New coalition raises mental illness awareness

Date: September 20, 2006
By: Fanna Haile-Selassie
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: A new advocacy group for mental health fights for awareness.  Fanna (Fauna) Haile-Selassie (High-lay-suh-la-say)has more from the Capitol.

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The National Alliance for Mental Illness has combined with a few professional groups to create a mental illness advocacy group called Missouri Partners in Crisis. 

The coalition is fighting to reinstate the money cut in Missouri for mental health.  Tim Harlan, the president of the state NAMI chapter, explains the effect the cuts have made.

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Description: Columbia has half the number of hospital beds but 20% more people.
 
The group plans to push mental health awareness on the legislature and stress the importance of helping those in need of assistance. 
 
From the state Capitol, this is Fanna Haile-Selassie



Intro: Missouri Partners in Crisis is an advocacy created for the awareness of mental illness.  Fanna (Fauna) Haile-Selassie (High-lay-suh-la-say) has more from the Capitol.  RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

The state chapter of the National Alliance for Mental illness, along with local police, jail, and judge organizations have combined to form the Missouri Partners in Crisis. 

Its goal is to make the community aware of mental illness. 

Gary Morse, the executive director for Community Alternatives says the coalition will try to persuade the legislature to provide more money for mental illness service groups.

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Description: Research shows that service groups will keep mentally ill out of the streets and jails.
 
 

One of the group's main concerns is the increasing number of psychiatric emergency visits.  The Department of Mental Health recored from 1993 to 2003, the number increased by 83.7 percent.

From the state Capitol, I'm Fanna Haile-Selassie