Supreme Court hears testimony on controversial abortion law
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Supreme Court hears testimony on controversial abortion law

Date: November 15, 2006
By: Lucie Wolken
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: The Supreme Court heard testimony on an abortion statute signed by Governor Blunt that says parents can sue adults who cause, aid, or assist a minor in having an abortion outside the state of Missouri.  Reporter Lucie Wolken has more from the State Capitol. 

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OutCue: SOC

The claims voiced by the plaintiffs challenged the constitutionality of the law based on questions of free speech. 

Rebecca Turner, Executive Director of Missouri Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice, said that the language of the law is subject to interpretation. 

 

Actuality:  TURNER01.WAV
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Description: I've had a number of people say to me, health nurses and clergy, say to me, 'are we allowed to talk to minors at all about abortion, if they come to us, can we even speak to them.'  So obviously that is a chilling effect.


A decision from the court is not expected to be heard until the spring.  From the State Capitol, I am Lucie Wolken.

 

Intro: Plaintiffs are calling an abortion statute a violation of free speech.  Lucie Wolken has more from the State Capitol.  RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

The law says that adults who cause, aid, or assist a minor in an abortion can be sued.  The Supreme Court heard arguments on the statute signed into law by Governor Blunt in 2005.

Eve Gartner, Senior Staff Attorney for Planned Parenthood Federation of America, says that besides the claims relating to infringement on free speech, the statute places an undo burden on minors.

Actuality:  GART01.WAV
Run Time: 00:18
Description: In order for a minor to have the accompaniment and assistance of a trusted adult, she would have to go through two separate judicial bypass proceedings, which simply serves no legitimate interest, and increases the likelihood that she won't have an abortion at all and increases the likelihood that her confidentiality would be breached. 

A Jackson County Circuit Court judge has put a temporary restraining order on the law until a higher court approves the construction of the law. 

From the state Capital, I am Lucie Wolken.