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Gasoline prices are impacting local schools' transportation.

September 28, 2004
By: Jade Mingus
State Capital Bureau

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Higher gas prices are hurting Missouri schools. Jade Mingus has more from the Capitol.

St. Louis County schools like Parkway are adjusting to the gas increase. Parkway Transportation Director Mike Byrne says high gas prices are making it hard on schools to provide cheap transportation.

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"At this time last year we were paying about 95 cents plus tax per gallon and price today is a $1.47 a gallon."

Byrne says Parkway School District built a surplus into their budget in case of a gas hike. But Byrne also says the increase will make the district cut back on some activities. From the state Capitol, I'm Jade Mingus.

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Some school transportation companies are hurting after the recent increase in gas. Jade Mingus reports from the state Capitol.

Higher gas prices have hurt St. Louis school bus companies like First Student. First Student provides transportation to local school districts. First Student Contract Manager Chuck Auer says some schools are cutting back.

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"And in terms of Hancock and Lindbergh, I'm passing those cost on each month. So it may mean that they cut back on their fieldtrips because their extra cost to them"

Auer also says more expensive gas means less profit for his company. But he says once the gas price passes a certain amount the burden is placed on the school districts. From the state Capital, I'm Jade Mingus.

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School officials say gas price increases make it hard to transport students cheaply. Jade Mingus has more from Jefferson City.

Current gas prices hurt school bus companies like First Student. First Student Contract Manager, Chuck Auer, says schools are reacting to the increase.

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"Ahh, some of the school districts have cut back because of their costs."

Auer also says that if the gas prices stay the same then it will mean less profits for his company. And if prices do not go down First Student will have to increase their own prices for next year.