A Senate plan that would allocate public money to pay for some students' tuition to nonsectarian private schools faced opposition.
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A Senate plan that would allocate public money to pay for some students' tuition to nonsectarian private schools faced opposition.

Date: April 8, 2014
By: Jessica Mensch
State Capitol Bureau
Links: SB 493

Intro: 
A Senate plan to use your tax money to pay for some students' private educations ran into a wall of opposition.
RunTime:  0:40
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: Some students from unaccredited districts could be able to transfer to nonsectarian private schools, on public dime.

Mike Lodewegen with the Association of School Administrators said that if private schools are going to be funded with public money, they need to be held to the same performance standards as public schools.

Actuality:  LODEW.WAV
Run Time:  00:07
Description: "I do not believe school choice is beneficial to students. We need to get serious about educating students where they're at."

Proponents of the bill argued that poverty stricken students in these unaccredited districts need more options for a quality education.

The committee took no immediate action on the bill.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Jessica Mensch.

Intro: 
A Senate bill that could use your tax money for some students' private school tuition faced a road block.
RunTime:  0:43
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: Some students from unaccredited districts could be able to transfer to nonsectarian private schools. 

Under the Senate bill, these students' tuition would be paid with public money.

Mike Lodewegen with the Association of School Administrators said that moving students out of their district does nothing to fix the problem for students who stay.

Actuality:  LODEW2.WAV
Run Time:  00:09
Description: "What are we gonna do? Normandy was provisionally accredited for twenty years. What are we gonna do to require the state to get engaged earlier? How can we do that?"

Proponents of the bill argued that poverty stricken students in these unaccredited districts need more options for a quality education.

The committee took no immediate action on the bill.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Jessica Mensch.


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