Bill granting public school students full religious liberty rights clears first House hurdle
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Bill granting public school students full religious liberty rights clears first House hurdle

Date: April 2, 2014
By: Steven Anthony
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: 
A proposed state measure would give public school students full freedom to express their religious beliefs
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OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: Springfield Republican Representative Elijah Haahr sponsors the bill which allows public school students to freely express a religious viewpoint before, during, and after school.

Haahr says the bill is needed to protect students from punishment from their school district.

Actuality:  HAAHR.WAV
Run Time:  00:13
Description: If a school or a child wants to offer a religious opinion on a topic in class, they need to be judged on legitimate, educational concerns, not on whether or not the teacher agrees with their viewpoint or anything like that.

Democrats said the bill was not needed because religious liberty rights already exist in the Constitution.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Steven Anthony, NewsRadio 1120 KMOX.  

Intro: 
Some House Democrats voted no on Missouri's religious liberty bill saying those rights are already in the Constitution
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Wrap: Jackson County Democratic representative Judy Morgan agreed with the premise of Springfield Republican representative Elijah Haahr's religious liberty bill.

However, she said the bill is redundant.

Actuality:  MORGAN.WAV
Run Time:  00:05
Description: I just really don't think there's a need for it. I think these rights are already guaranteed in our Constitution.

The bill also allows students to wear religious clothing and jewelry on school property.

The bill received first round approval in the House with a bipartisan majority.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Steven Anthony, NewsRadio 1120 KMOX.


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