Missouri's education department says anxiety is high over debt ceiling breach
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Missouri's education department says anxiety is high over debt ceiling breach

Date: October 8, 2013
By: Alexander Mallin
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: 
A Missouri Education Department spokeswoman says districts across the state will suffer if the government fails to extend its borrowing limit by October 17.
RunTime:  0:44
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education takes in well over $500 million in federal funding each year.

Communications director Sarah Potter says that money funds everything from school lunches, Title I, special education, and career and technical programs.

She says if Congress can't reach a deal on the debt ceiling by the deadline those programs would be in danger of being cut off.

Actuality:  POTT1.WAV
Run Time:  00:11
Description: "All we can do right now is help school districts be informed of the situation, let them know of the possible ramifications. We're just trying to do that at this point."

Potter says the state's poorest schools would take the greatest hit from a debt ceiling breach.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Alex Mallin, Newsradio 1120, KMOX.  

Intro: 
As Congress enters the second week of the government shutdown, a Missouri Education Department spokeswoman says a different deadline could hurt districts across the state.
RunTime:  0:46
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: According to the U.S. Treasury Department, the country will reach its borrowing limit on October 17.

Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education spokeswoman Sarah Potter says if Congress can't reach a deal by then, millions of dollars of funding to the state's schools will be in danger.

Actuality:  POTT2.WAV
Run Time:  00:15
Description: "We're really concerned about, especially those districts that rely heavily on federal funds. Those are the poorest districts in the state that are heavily funded through Title I, they have a high population of free and reduced lunch. They're going to be affected the most we believe."
 
Potter says her department is helping school districts to be informed of the situation, but isn't sure of a concrete plan of action if the debt ceiling is breached.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Alex Mallin, Newsradio 1120, KMOX.  


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