The House passes a bill that would set timing intervals for yellow lights.
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The House passes a bill that would set timing intervals for yellow lights.

Date: May 1, 2012
By: Ashley Hartman
State Capitol Bureau
Links: SB611

Intro: 
If you've ever gotten a ticket because of a short yellow light, the House has come to your rescue.
RunTime:  0:53
OutCue: 

SOC

 

Wrap: The Missouri House of Representatives passed a bill that would require the Department of Transportation to establish a minimum interval time for yellow lights. 

Republican Representative Rick Stream says the bill would impose standards for the length of time for the yellow light depending on traffic.  

Actuality:  STREAM.WAV
Run Time:  00:12
Description: "Once the red light cameras were installed several years ago, several municipalities around the state shortened the length of time for the yellow lights so that they could get more offenders actually going through the red lights."

St. Louis City Democratic Representative Margo McNeil says the bill would not make a huge difference and is costly to the state. 

But, Stream says after the city of Arnold implemented this formula for their yellow light timings, there was a ninety percent reduction in red light tickets.

The bill now goes back to the Senate to review the House changes. 

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Ashley Hartman.

Intro: 
Missouri's House has voted to give you more time to run through yellow lights.
RunTime:  0:43
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: After one Missouri city experienced revenue cuts due to reduced red light tickets, the Missouri House passed a bill that would require a formula for this minimum light change interval. 

Republican Representative Rick Stream says this bill would prevent the amount of traffic violations throughout the state. 

Actuality:  STREAMM.WAV
Run Time:  00:07
Description: "This legislation will ensure that municipalities are held up to a state standard that ensures safety for all Missouri drivers across the state."

St. Louis City Democratic Representative Margo McNeil spoke against the bill saying it would cost the state a lot of money and would not make much of a difference. 

The yellow light forgiveness bill now goes back to the Senate to review some House changes. 

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Ashley Hartman. 


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