Voter ID Bill Back in the House
MDN Menu
MDN.ORG Mo. Digital News Missouri Digital News MDN.ORG: Mo. Digital News MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News

Voter ID Bill Back in the House

Date: February 6, 2012
By: Matt Evans
State Capitol Bureau
Links: HB 1104

Intro: 
The voter ID bill that Governor Jay Nixon vetoed last year is back in the House this year. Lawmakers are again at odds if Missourians should be required to have a government-issued photo ID to cast a ballot.
RunTime:  0:37
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: ((NATS ARGUING))

Democratic Representative Jamilah Nasheed and bill sponsor Republican Representative Shane Schoeller bumped heads over the bill.

Nasheed says the bill would curtail voter's rights. Democratic Representative Stacey Newman agrees.

Actuality:  NEWMAN01.WAV
Run Time:  00:09
Description: "If there's one eligible long-time voter who cannot vote under this, it's constitutionally and horribly wrong for this body to even consider."

Proponents of the bill say the two to three-million dollar price tag per election the voter ID requirement comes with is worth preventing voter fraud in the state.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Matt Evans. Newsradio 1120 KMOX.

Intro: 
Missouri lawmakers are taking up a Governor Jay Nixon vetoed last year. The bill that would give voters the opportunity to decide if a government-issued photo ID should be required to vote.
RunTime:  0:33
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: ((NATS ARGUING))

Democratic Representative Jamilah Nasheed grilled bill sponsor Republican Shane Schoeller by saying the bill is a waste of money and infringes on voter's rights.

Republican Representative Jason Smith co-sponsors the bill and says in Reynolds County, more people are registered to vote than people actually living in the county.

Actuality:  SMITH01.WAV
Run Time:  00:05
Description: "But when Frisky the dog gets to cast a vote in Reynolds County. That will cancel out their vote."

Smith says even one fraudulent vote skews entire elections.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Matt Evans. Newsradio 1120 KMOX.

Intro: 
The voter ID bill that Governor Jay Nixon vetoed last year is back in the House this year. Lawmakers are again at odds if Missourians should be required to have a government-issued photo ID to cast a ballot.
RunTime:  0:43
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: ((NATS ARGUING))

Democratic Representative Jamilah Nasheed grilled bill sponsor Republican Shane Schoeller by saying the bill is a waste of money and infringes on voter rights.

Proponents of the bill say it actually protects voter rights and prevents voter fraud. 

Democratic Representative Chris Kelly says the bill is strictly political.

Actuality:  KELLY01.WAV
Run Time:  00:14
Description: "No one can look themselves in the eye and say it has any other purpose than decrease the probability that older, poorer African-American women will vote. Mr. Speaker I'm ashamed to be here today."

If this bill passes, voters will also have to pass a constitutional amendment before it goes into effect.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Matt Evans.

 

Intro: 
Missouri lawmakers are taking up a Governor Jay Nixon vetoed last year. The bill that would give voters the opportunity to decide if a government-issued photo ID should be required to vote.
RunTime:  0:44
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: ((NATS ARGUING))

Democratic Representative Jamilah Nasheed and bill sponsor Republican Representative Shane Schoeller bumped heads over the bill on the House floor.

Nasheed says the bill infringes on voter's rights and wastes taxpayer money. 

Schoeller says the bill protects the rights of voters and it's worth the cost.

Democratic Representative Steve Webb says the bill aims to give Republicans a political advantage in elections.

Actuality:  WEBB01.WAV
Run Time:  00:09
Description: "But when we make this totally political, we drug our names through the mud. And we wonder why society hates us."

If the bill passes through the legislature, voters will have to approve a constitutional amendment before it's enacted.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Matt Evans.


Missouri Digital News is produced by Missouri Digital News, Inc. -- a non profit organization of current and former journalists.