Missouri House passes a bill to help parents pay child support

Missouri House passes a bill to help parents pay child support

Date: April 28, 2009
By: Lauren Mickler
State Capitol Bureau
Links: SB 140

Intro: The Missouri House gave final passage to a bill Tuesday that will help imprisoned parents pay child support.

Lauren Mickler (MIKE-ler) has more from Jefferson City.

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Missourians struggling with paying child support are going to get a little help from the state.

The House passed a bill Tuesday that will arrange a new court system for those who can't pay.

Currently deadbeat moms and dads get sent to jail, but bill supporter, Representative Sam Komo, says jail time doesn't help the bills get paid.

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Description: "We're throwing dads or sometimes mothers in prison for non-payment, and if that happens, I can't ever look at getting child support. They sure can't pay while there in jail, and once they come out they'll be limited in paying. If they had a problem before, they'll definitely be limited in paying now."

The new system will offer job training, GED programs, and how to make payment plans.

From the state Capitol, I'm Lauren Mickler.


Intro: Tuesday, the Missouri House passed and sent the governor a bill that will provide job training programs for parents who can't pay child support instead of jail time.

Lauren Mickler (MIKE-ler) has more from Jefferson City.

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OutCue: SOC

The state currently puts those who can't fulfill their child support in jail, but the legislation passed Tuesday could help them pay their bills.

The House sponsor is Jefferson County's Representative Tim Jones.

He says the measure would offer struggling parents some new tools.

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Description: "Let's give these men and women opportunities for job training, and other resources, which is contained in the bill. Let's keep them out of jail, let's give them the potential to be in the work force, and lets give them the potential to continue seeing their sons and daughters."
Those "other" resources he's talking about include GED training and drug rehabilitation.
 
Jones said jailing delinquent parents keeps them from working, and doesn't help them pay the support.

From the state Capitol, I'm Lauren Mickler.


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