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Jack Cunningham's Blog in 2008
Blog log

Posted December 17, 2008: 

This year has been an interesting one.  Covering election night was exhilarating.  Now, at the end of the year, I have covered a large amount of different stories.  Interestingly, I began and ended (relatively) with a story concerning the limit of campaign finance contributions. My favorite moments of the year have been covering the Castle Doctrine, my Transportation story and Election night.  I wish I could continue to cover news down here, but my schedule looks too hectic to fit it in.  Hopefully, I can find time next year to come work here again, because I enjoyed it very much, even if it drove me crazy at times.

Posted November 20, 2008: 

The past few weeks have emerged as an important time in the country.  While old elected officials are winding down, the new ones are preparing for office.  They are meeting with their predecessors to plan ahead for the upcoming term, and it makes for very interesting stories.  Many politicians have to make peace with one another in order to progress in their respective positions, even if they disagree with the views of that other person. The thing that bothers me is that some elected officials have a lot of improvement to do, but they might not have the solution or the resources for the solution.  I realize this happens every time there is a change in power, but it seems like much needs to get done, and there isn't a clear starting point.  Hopefully they can find a good footing on their first step and then go from there.  Otherwise, we'll continue to spiral downward.

Posted November 6, 2008: 

I had the opportunity to cover the Kenny Hulshof watch party on November 4th, and it was unlike anything I have ever experienced.  The night started with a buzzing atmosphere when results of the Missouri Gubernatorial race and the Presidential race were rolling in.  As the night carried on, the party took on a more somber feel, because Hulshof was losing and so was McCain.  When Hulshof finally gave his concession speech, tears were streaming down the faces of many guests, including Hulshof's wife Renee.  Yet, his supporters still cheered loudly for him.  After that, most people's eyes turned towards the television to follow the Presidential race, in which Barack Obama was mounting a favorable lead.  Eventually, the results were final and Obama had won the election, and he gave a speech soon after.  Once again, members of Obama's crowd were cheering and crying in joy.  At this point I realized that so many people argue about politics and which candidate they support, but at least there is passion.  The amount of emotion I saw on Tuesday night overwhelmed me, and I am proud to be in a country where people care so much and have the power to vote for the candidate they support.

Posted October 23, 2008: 

The election is near, but everyone needs to stay educated on the candidates.  This includes all candidates within your respective state positions, not just the presidential candidates.  The ballot issues also make an important difference and should not be ignored.  Whether it means researching before the election date or before you fill out an absentee ballot, you should give the greatest amount of attention before time runs out and the election is concluded in less than two weeks.

Posted October 14, 2008

The market is taking an upturn after a long period of drastic drops.  As it turns out, Missouri farmers haven't felt the hit from the credit market crisis yet, but they should expect effects in the future.  They operate on a different schedule than the rest of the country, with planting in the spring and harvesting in the fall.  They won't need credit until next year when they plan for planting.  However, they could run into a problem when they finish harvesting and want to store their grains with large agricultural businesses, because the large agro-businesses have experienced some economical woes.

Posted October 7, 2008:

 I read an article in the Columbia Missourian today that talked about the uncertainty of the "Roots 'N' Blues 'N' BBQ" festival.  The uncertainty is because the city's Convention and Visitor's Bureau donated $100,000 this year, but they will not be able to repeat the favor next year.  The bureau said they would be willing to give to the festival in the future, but this amount was a one-time gift.  This seems unfortunate since the festival brings together the city and the university over a few days.  An estimated 120,000 people attended the weekend, including myself and some friends.  The event brings excitement to the downtown "District" of Columbia, and I hope the festival works out in the future.

Posted September 30, 2008:

On Friday night, the Presidential debate aired, and I was pleasantly surprised by the amount of my friends who watched.  I had been somewhat skeptical leading up to the debate, because I can even be somewhat apathetic at times.  I walked up and down the hall of my house and found all of my friends watching the debate.  Rather than partying on a Friday night, these guys were watching attentively and engaging in educated discussion.  Obviously the discussions became heated at times, but the topic of discussion was about politics and the economy rather than what to do for the weekend.

Posted September 18, 2008:

The St. Louis Rams have had a rough start to the season, and their future in St. Louis is anything but certain.  I read that the organization dedicated a street to the former Rams owner, Georgia Frontiere, naming the street "Georgia's Way." This change seems to promise a sort of permanence in the team's hometown.  However, another 3-13 season would hardly increase attendance at the football games.  At the end of the day, money is the true name of the game, and the team needs to improve their record to improve revenue.

Posted September 11, 2008:

I realized, while reporting on the Attorney General debate, that most of the seats in Fisher Auditorium were empty and it made me wonder.  Why would the Journalism School prohibit any paying Journalism student from attending a debate that barely filled half of the seats.  Yet, the debate was closed to anyone who did not possess a specific press pass.  In fact, one journalist was denied entry, even though she is covering the Attorney General race and wished to conduct an interview with Senator Mike Gibbons.

Posted September 4, 2008:

Republican voters traditionally stand on the conservative side. The Republican party has used experienced men as their candidates for the past few decades.  Even though Alaska Governor Sarah Palin does not fit this mold, she has received a warm welcome from her Republican supporters.  The Republican running mates most recently visited Michigan where they found a large amount of support.  Palin believes that this campaign will help bring change to Washington.  If this is true, then they should give their Democratic opponents a good fight.


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