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Missouri Government News for Week of Dec. 7, 1998


Missouri's governor endorses censure of the president.

The chief spokesman for Missouri's governor says Mel Carnahan favors the Democratic Congressional proposal to censure the president.

The proposal has been offered as an alternative to impeachment. Carnahan's endorsement came on the eve of the schedule impeachment vote of the House Judiciary Committee.

See our package of radio stories for details.


Governor's conference addresses cost of higher education

Governor Carnahan says he wants to make going to school less expensive. Education officials from throughout the state gathered in Jefferson City this week to address the issue of rising college costs, and a new commission has been established to examine ways to bring fees down.

That commission will issue a report next December. William Troutt, the chair of a national group that looked at higher education last year, says Missouri is one of the first states in the nation to launch a coordinated effort aimed at bringing tuition down.

See our newspaper story and our package of radio stories.


Warm weather posing problems for Missourians.

Conservation Department staffers are warning that the unsual warm weather of the early winter can cause problems for Missourians.

The weather is creating stress for pine trees and it also is making it more likely that Christmas trees brought into the home will have bugs.

See our radio stories on stress to treesnd bugs in Christmasrees.


Carnahan stays out of Griffin clemency issue

A spokesman for Governor Mel Carnahan says the governor does not expect the President to consult him regarding Speaker Bob Griffin's request for clemency. Griffin was convicted of accepting bribes while in office, and has at least two more years left in his federal prision term. Griffin wants his sentence to be commuted so he can care for his wife, who suffered a stroke this fall.

See our package of radio stories for details.