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Senate Gives Preliminary Approval to Clean Air Bill

March 24, 1998
By: Tristin Yeager
State Capital Bureau

The state Senate is one vote away from passing a bill supporters say would prevent Missouri from losing up to 400 million dollars in federal highway funds. Tristin Yeager reports from the state capitol.

The bill is an attempt to meet the federal mandates of the Clean Air Act St. Louis was supposed to meet by November 1996. Failure to comply could result in a loss of federal highway funds and sanctions from the Environmental Protection Agency. Supporters say this bill would meet the requirements but Republican St. Louis County Senator Francis Flotron is not so sure.

Actuality:Actuality:flot1.wav
RunTime: :17.645
OutCue: "...it's just really hard to justify."
Contents: Flotron says he thinks the law is ridiculous and adds that the sanctions are out of proportion to the problem.

Bill sponsor St. Louis County Senator Wayne Goode says he is confidant the bill will meet federal requirements.

The state Senate gave first round approval to a bill supporters say would meet the Clean Air Act requirements St. Louis was supposed to meet in 1996. Tristin Yeager reports from the state capitol.

The bill would allow sale of reformulated gas, establish a Clean Screen program to test car emissions along roadsides, and fix problems with the I-M-240 tailpipe testing program approved in 1994.

Bill sponsor, St. Louis County Senator Wayne Goode.

Actuality:good1.wav
RunTime: :14.217
OutCue: "...by the Department of Natural Resources."
Contents: Goode says he thinks the bill makes the process more user-friendly for the public and makes the law easier to implement by the Department of Natural Resources.

Goode says he wanted to send a good and complete bill to the House because of its past tendency to debate the Clean Air Act instead of focusing on how to meet federal regulations.